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How To Prepare A Herbal Infusion

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An infusion (also called a tisane) is water-based extracts of flowers and leaves, and used where a mild preparation is required. It made in the same way as a pot of tea; strained through a muslin sieve and drunk while hot to aid sleep or easy a sore throat. Tea made with camomile (bags) for sleep, or a mug of hot honey and lemon juice for a cold, comes under this heading.
What you'll need: 
A modern herbal
1: 
Use 1 oz of dried herbs or double the amount if using fresh ingredients, to make 1 pint of liquid. For example: use dried peppermint as a digestive stimulant between and after meals.
2: 
Add the required herb to a mug or small china jug with a lid to prevent the goodness from evaporating. Pour on boiling water and allow to infuse for 5-10 mins before drinking.
3: 
Herbal infusions may be sweetened with honey or brown sugar, or flavored with fresh lemon juice.
Conclusion: 
The standard dosage is one tea cup two or three times a day for adults, and half this amount for children., which should be prepared and used immediately. Some infusions (i.e. lavender) can be allowed to cool and used for compresses to treat headaches.
Tips: 
Read RH Encyclopedia of Herbs and their uses by Deni Brown
Warnings: 
Herbal treatment often complements conventional medical treatment, but it can also interfere with it.
References: 

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