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How To Make Waxy Cotton Fuel Rocks

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Wondering what to do with those candle ends and tea light remnants left over from Christmas? The 'throwing them out' option, is a waste of valuable hydrocarbons. Why not convert them into waxy cotton fuel rocks? This type of fuel is very easy to make, they use it in countries where it's difficult to get hexamine and it can be used to cook food and boil water in an emergency like a grid outage situation, when camping or it can be used as firelighters.
What you'll need: 
Candle ends and tea light remnants (you can use whole candles or tea lights)
Cotton wool
Heat source like a stove
String made from natural fibres
Metal tray
Scissors
Cooking pot
Wooden spoon or spatula
1: 
Using the scissors, cut some short lengths of string to use as wicks in the finished fuel rocks.
2: 
Arrange the wicks on a metal tray so that there is enough space to place the rocks onto the wicks, without the rocks touching each other as they cool.
3: 
Place the candle ends and tea light remnants into the cooking pot.
4: 
Place the pot on a gas or electric ring on a cooker, keeping it at a low heat so that the wax melts slowly.
5: 
When the wax has melted, drop some cotton wool balls into it, so that they absorb the wax. Use the wooden spoon/spatula to ensure that the cotton is saturated in the wax. Continue adding cotton until all of the wax has been absorbed.
6: 
Place each wax saturated cotton wool ball onto one of the wicks on the metal tray and leave them to cool. The wicks will stick to the fuel rocks as they cool, enabling you to light them later, when you come to use them.
Conclusion: 
This is a good way to avoid wasting valuable hydrocarbons and if you make some fuel rocks now and store them in your emergency cupboard, you will be able to cook food and make hot drinks in the unfortunate event that you lose your electricity or gas supply.
Warnings: 
Don't overheat the wax, a gentle heat is all that is necessary to melt it

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