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How To Make A Will

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Wills are a way of making sure that the people you want to benefit get what you want them to have. Sorting things out now can prevent any distressing disputes over who is entitled to your property when you die. Although making a will is something we find a chore, it is nothing to the upset and aggravation for families of someone who dies intestate. There are four main ways of making a will:
1: 
The safest way if there is an amount of money and/or property involved is through a solicitor.
2: 
Alternatively, you could use the will-making service provided by most banks.
3: 
Using an on-line will-making service.
4: 
If your assets are limited you can draw up your own will using a will form available from most good high street stationers, bearing in mind that if you get it wrong, it could become invalid.
5: 
Remember: If you are co-habiting, your partner could receive nothing.
6: 
If you wish non-next of kin, i.e. step-children or friends to benefit, you must make a will.
7: 
The laws governing intestacy do not allow the estate to pass automatically to a spouse.
8: 
If you are married and die intestate, your spouse is only entitled to the first £200,000 of your estate with a life interest in the remainder. The balance goes to your next of kin, be it parents, siblings or long-lost distant relatives.
Conclusion: 
You may feel that you’re too young to make a will, or at this particular point in time you have nothing worthwhile to leave, or that it’s just something else to think about at a time when you can do without the hassle. Even if it’s only ensuring that your best friend gets to sort out your personal effects, it’s worth taking the time. You can appoint anyone you like to execute your will, including beneficiaries but if you appoint a solicitor, accountant or banker, they will probably charge a fee.
Warnings: 
If you do not leave a will the Government decides who benefits and it may not necessarily pass to the people you think it will.

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