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How to help back ache

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According to research, 8 out of 10 people in the UK suffer from a bad back at some stage in their lives. Back pain can be avoided in many cases. Follow these steps for how to help a bad back.
1: 
Keep moving: Our backs were designed to move. However many people think that if they find a good ergonomic position they should stay there. This is a common misconception. So, even though we can sit in an ergonomically sound position longer than a poor one, actually sitting still causes more harm than good. This is because when we change the position we’re sat in, the workload and pressures are shifted onto other muscles. There are a number of back supports available to promote a healthy back posture. However, if you can find a support that provides both sound ergonomic support as well as providing the ability (indeed encouragement) to move, you are fulfilling the biomechanical needs of the spine and doing everything that you can to help. The Dynaspine Back Support provides this form of dynamic support.
2: 
Back ache exercises: Strengthening the back muscles through lower back pain exercises is essential for preventing and treating back ache. An effective way of deciding on the best lower back pain exercises to use is to look at the biomechanical causes and provide exercises to deal with these causes. This enables us to take the pressure off the back without working it directly, and so reducing the risk of hurting ourselves.
3: 
Avoid resting: When minor back injuries occur, many people believe that resting their back for long periods of time will help relieve the pain. However, sitting or lying in a static position can cause more harm than good. As above, our backs were designed to move so keep resting to a minimum and begin moving as soon as possible.
4: 
Apply heat: Tension and stiffness can often be eased by applying a heat pack or hot water bottle to the affected area. Having a hot bath also helps! By loosening the muscles you should also find that you can move more freely.
5: 
Apply ice Applying a cold compress such as ice to a swollen or inflamed area of the back can often help to relieve back ache. Make sure the ice is wrapped up in a towel or similar to stop it from damaging the skin.
6: 
Medicines: If you find that your back ache is too strong to handle try using painkillers such as paracetamol/aspirin or anti-inflammatory tablets like ibuprofen. These can help with back pain relief, however if you have an underlying problem which is causing your back pain, you should seek advice from your GP as medicines may only mask the problem. You may need further treatment from a physiotherapist or other healthcare professional.
7: 
Be patient: Minor back injuries last for around 6 weeks. Don’t be impatient with your recovery, it takes time. As the back pain improves make sure you don’t overdo it as you risk causing more back problems.
Conclusion: 
As with any health complaint, be sure to consult a doctor should symptons persist.

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