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How to clear snow and ice from your driveway

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So it has been snowing again and the roads, pavements and drives all over the country are covered in a thick blanket of snow. But, what is the best way to remove it, and what are the dos and don'ts? This guide should be able to help you to keep your driveway clear without causing yourself an injury.
What you'll need: 
table salt
a shovel or snow shovel
warm clothing
1: 
The first thing to do is to clear a path down the middle of your drive, or area you wish to clear, this is so you have an area to walk on. Use your shovel or snow shovel, if you have one, to move the snow out of the way. Don't move it on to someone else's path or over drains or anything else that may become blocked.
2: 
Once you have cleared a path down the middle, you can proceed to shovel the snow away from the sides.
3: 
You can use normal table salt on the path to prevent black ice from forming. The recommended amount is about a tablespoon per metre. If you don't have enough salt then ash or sand can be applied, this won't stop the ice forming, but will provide some grip underfoot.
Tips: 
It is best to clear the snow early in the day so that it doesn't build up too much.
Warnings: 
Try not to use water to clear your path, as it will re-freeze and turn to black ice.
Do not put salt on planted areas, as it might kill the plants.

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