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How to boil an Egg

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What better way to start the day with a good boiled egg? Some of us may enjoy dipping our bread soldiers into the runny yolk whereas others may prefer the hard boiled approach. Which ever way you like your eggs cooked, this guide will show you how best to do it.
What you'll need: 
Eggs
A saucepan
Water
A timer
1: 
Choose the quantity of eggs you wish to boil
2: 
Find an appropriately sized saucepan and add your eggs. Fill it with cold water so that it covers the eggs by half an inch.
3: 
Place the saucepan on a heat. Once the water hits boiling point bring it to a simmer and start your timer. You can use your watch, a clock or an egg timer.
4: 
If you like your eggs soft boiled then take them out as follows: After 3 minutes if you like the yolk really runny. After 4 minutes for a yolk and white that is just set and after 5 minutes for a white and yolk that is perfectly set. After 5 minutes the yolk will be set but squidgy in the centre.
5: 
If you prefer your eggs to be hard boiled then take them out after 7-9 minutes depending on how hard you wish them to be.
6: 
Now run the eggs under cold water for a few minutes until they have cooled down and you are able to handle them safely.
7: 
Peel away the shell from the eggs and serve.
Conclusion: 
You now hard some delicious boiled eggs to enjoy.
Tips: 
Once you have repeated this procedure a number of times you’ll know exactly how long to wait for the perfect egg.
During the boil, pressure may build up in the egg causing the egg to crack; a simple pinprick will alleviate this pressure.
If the eggs are less than 4 days old add an extra 30 seconds to the timing. Again with practise you’ll learn your optimum timing.
Warnings: 
Do not boil eggs that have come straight from the refrigerator, they are likely to crack.
To prevent further cracking use a saucepan that is just big enough for the eggs so that they do not swirl around crashing into one another.
References: 

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